Tag: social media for healthcare

social media video strategy

Video Content Can Really Boost your Healthcare Brand’s Social Media Strategy

See why healthcare brands are incorporating video into their social media strategies and get recent examples of social media videos from healthcare brands that demonstrate how the approach to social content can be adopted by organizations of any size.

healthcare twitter chats

Twitter Chats for Healthcare Organizations Boost Health Literacy and Patient Engagement

Twitter chats hosted regularly by healthcare organizations can raise awareness of important health issues. Here are a few strong examples of how healthcare organizations can pursue thought leadership and establish connections with patients and members by putting their expertise into a format that works for and engages a social media audience.

UCSF Imaging recognized for active Twitter strategy

Successful Twitter Strategy Helps Healthcare Brand Stand Out Among Peers

Authors of a recent social media study, which named Media Logic client UCSF Imaging a top Twitter account, make the following recommendation: “More departments are encouraged to take advantage of [Twitter] to engage colleagues in radiology and other medical specialties, their patients, the media and the general public.”

Digital and social marketing for telehealth innovations from Anthem BCBS

Anthem BCBS Promotes Telehealth as a Top Innovation

Right now, since telehealth isn’t covered by many health plans, it can be a point of differentiation in a time of great competition in the healthcare industry. As a result, Anthem not only directly promotes its telehealth benefit via its websites, but also works to educate its members (and others) about telehealth via several other channels.

how digital and social tools may reduce hospital readmissions

Can Digital and Social Tools Reduce Hospital Readmissions?

Though not without problems, new technologies point to solutions for healthcare communications beyond print discharge papers. And the good news is not all of them require investment in a mobile app. Many existing digital and social tools already have the potential to assist with communication that can reinforce physician instructions and clear up confusion and, as a result, have the potential to avoid unnecessary readmissions.

When healthcare data merges with social data predictive results improved

What Does Healthcare Data Need to Make It Most Useful? Facebook!

As patient data gets digitized and analyzed in an effort to improve medical services and outcomes, bad data can be an obstacle to the best care. Enter Facebook. Ever heard of it? That’s tongue-in-cheek, of course, but have you considered the popular social network as a resource for quality healthcare?

What Facebook Zero Means for Healthcare Marketers

If you’ve invested in creating a robust liker base for your hospital’s Facebook page, you may be thinking, “What now?” And if you’re just getting started with marketing providers and services via Facebook, you may be thinking, “Why bother?” Take heart.

Online Reviews Making You Queasy? On Proactive Marketing for Healthcare Providers

Trustworthy (or not) and accurate (or not), consumers are using online reviews at least in part to select their healthcare providers. And as more “shopping” behaviors are adopted in healthcare, these reviews can be perceived as measurements. But what is being measured? Outcomes? Costs? Bedside manners? Patient satisfaction does not necessarily equal quality care.

Food Porn and Heat Maps: Exciting Social Marketing Ideas for Hospitals and Insurers

Would a really big, really fun idea light a fire under your social marketing efforts? Well, you’re in luck! We’ve gathered some inspiration from outside the healthcare industry for hospital and healthcare marketers...

Can Social Media Help Prevent and Manage Chronic Disease?

A new report finds that “social media can reduce the burden of chronic disease on the U.S. health system by [helping] patients achieve personal health goals, correct high-risk behavior and better manage chronic conditions.” That sounds like win-win: a benefit for payers/providers, as well as patients. So how does it work?